All in Lectionary Notes

Gospel: Luke 20:9-20 (Lent 5: Series C)

Your hearers are not first-century religious leaders in Israel. Neither are present-day pastors and church leaders. This is an important point for a sermon on this text, because Jesus is speaking to the people of Israel about their religious leaders. What he says in this parable has significance for us today, and needs to be preached. But the application is not direct and therefore should be done carefully.

Gospel: Luke 13:1-9 (Lent 3: Series C)

We’re tempted to try and connect the dots. Something bad happens to someone and we can’t help but wonder about the cause. Even if we don’t say it out loud, we are tempted to think they must have done something to deserve it. They must be guilty of something. God must be punishing them for something we don’t know about. But Jesus stops this thinking in its tracks.

Old Testament: Deuteronomy 26:1-11 (Lent 1: Series C)

. A possible preaching point is the reversal we see in the life of Christ. In the Deuteronomy passage the people are given instructions on how to give offerings when they are led out of the wilderness into the Promised Land of Canaan. In the Luke passage, Jesus leaves the Promised Land to go out into the wilderness as the Sin-bearer to take our sins back to Satan (and then to the cross). God gives great blessings to His people, but only through the One who is a substitute in our place, His Son.

Gospel: Luke 4:1-13 (Lent 1: Series C)

There are two ways to think about what’s happening when someone is tempted. The first is to imagine temptation as enticement toward something bad and wrong. This is probably the more common of the two. But there’s another way of thinking about it. Temptation could also be seen as encouragement away from something good and right. Lent begins with an opportunity to contemplate Jesus’ temptation, and the second seems more helpful.

Old Testament: Deuteronomy 34:1-12 (Transfiguration: Series C)

Joshua takes over the role as leader of Israel, but he is seen as Moses Himself in the words; “So the people of Israel obeyed him and did as the LORD commanded Moses” (v. 9). This transfer of leadership took place earlier with instructions from the LORD. Later, the LORD God shows His favor and presence with Joshua in the parting of the Jordan and other signs which suggest Joshua is the new Moses… but he is not!